FolkestoneJack's Tracks

Through the Lion’s Mouth

Posted in Kadugannawa, Kandy, Sri Lanka by folkestonejack on January 29, 2018

The complications of arranging photo stops on the main line were highlighted by our arrival at one of the most memorable locations – the Lion’s Mouth, a distinctive rock that overhangs the line at the Kadugannawa end of the Moragalla Tunnel.

The Lion’s Mouth is a spot that has fascinated photographers since the completion of the tunnel in 1866 and looks remarkably unchanged from a photograph in the British Library from the 1870s. Our timings allowed just one attempt at the shot (12.10) before we had to clear the line for an express, arriving at Kadugannawa ten minutes later. Once the express had passed through we were able to roll back down to the Lion’s Mouth for a second attempt.

B1d class steam locomotive no. 340 at the the Lion’s Mouth

Once this was all complete we were able to return to Kadugannawa and take a look round the National Railway Museum during a lull in the action. It’s a compact museum based around a goods shed with some locomotives and rolling stock displayed on the adjacent sidings (admission 500 rupees) with slightly forbidding no photography signs attached to just about everything.

The museum collection includes the oldest surviving steam locomotive in the country – an E1 class tank locomotive (no. 93) built by Dubs & Co in 1898. It seems astonishing to think that this was still in industrial use, in the mills, as late as the 1980s. Other exhibits on outdoor display include some interesting looking railcars, an early railway carriage (no. 4173), a class S3 diesel-hydraulic multiple unit (no. 613), a class M1 diesel-electric loco (no. 560) built by Brush in 1955, a diesel electric 0-4-0 shunter (no. 500) built by Armstrong Whitworth in 1934 and a N2 narrow gauge diesel (no. 732).

As we wandered the consist of our train was re-arranged to give us a brake van at the end of the wagons when the diesel and other carriages are taken off during runpasts. Our onward journey resumed in mid-afternoon (14:50), taking us through Pilimathalawa (15:00), where we were all astonished to see a maroon Routemaster in public service, then on to Peradeniya Junction (15:10).

Steaming through Peradeniya Junction

The triangular junction station at Peradeniya has three signal cabins to co-ordinate movements and you can see why they would be needed. Historically, this has always been one of the busiest spots on the Sri Lankan railway network and it certainly demonstrated that during our stay.

There are some lovely photographic opportunities here, including a beautifully positioned Buddha at the end of the station platform and a semaphore signal gantry. Unfortunately, the number of trains through the station made it difficult to make the most of this – when we arrived we had three trains cross so by the time we were able to attempt our shot with the gantry the sun had slipped behind the clouds and looked quite unlikely to return! I suspect the crew will have been relieved that the light had disappeared as their shift started at 11.30pm last night…

Our departure from the junction (16:39) left us with the very short run in to Kandy’s rather gorgeous art deco station (16:51). The day had a little more to give with a couple of false departures in rather dark and moody conditions, but after that we headed off to dinner and our hotels in Nawalapitiya.

Gallery

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