FolkestoneJack's Tracks

Autumnal adventures at Kew

Posted in England, London by folkestonejack on October 19, 2019

A beautifully clear and sunny start to the weekend made a welcome change from the rain of the past fortnight. It was enough to tempt me out for a long overdue return to Kew Gardens. I have been meaning to return ever since the Hive was installed in 2016 and since the Great Pagoda was re-opened after restoration in 2018. Somehow, I have not managed to find the time until now. Better late than never, as I seem to say rather too frequently…

A view of Kew from the top floor of the Great Pagoda

The Hive is a remarkable construction, made from 169,300 pieces of aluminium, which was originally designed as the British Pavilion for World Expo 2015 in Milan. It was re-installed at Kew in 2016 and has since become a firm favourite of visitors. The structure was designed to give visitors a multi-sensory experience that captures the essence of the life of a working bee.

One of my colleagues visited in 2016 and gave a terrific account of the experience. It has been in place for a few years on, so doesn’t get quite as much attention as when it was brand new. In some ways that’s good, as it is quite something to stand there on your own and absorb the gentle and quite astonishingly beautiful soundtrack of a 40,000-strong honeybee colony. A lovely way to start my visit before continuing on towards the always impressive Palm House and on to the southern section of the park.

The Hive

The Great Pagoda was built in 1762 as part of the landscaping for Princess Augusta, the founder of the botanic gardens. On its opening the rooves of the 10 storey pagoda were decorated with 80 hand-painted carved Dragons but these only lasted 22 years. It was a delight to read that the restoration work on the Great Pagoda would see the return of dragons after a 234 year interval. The result is every bit as spectacular as you can imagine from the description.

I hadn’t intended to take a look inside, but on a whim decided to buy a ticket at the Pagoda and after climbing the 253 steps was rewarded by a stunning view across to the Temperate House while it was still bathed in sunshine. From this height the shadow of the pagoda across the gardens is pretty impressive too and surprisingly photogenic in its own right. The pagoda is only a few weeks away from its winter closure, so I was glad to have got my timings right on this occasion.

One of the drgaons perched on the Great Pagoda

Quite apart from these permanent attractions at Kew Gardens, my visit was timed for the end of the exhibition of works by Dale Chihuly, of which more in the next post. Overall, it was a splendid day out and, as ever, I underestimated the time you can spend in the gardens. There are still many sections of park that I have not reached. After a series of visits to Kew in the autumn, I must remember to make my next visit in the Spring and get a very different burst of colour.

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